Why The Cavendish Hotel has a Monopoly on enjoying a trip to London

Incredible view of London from the penthouse at the Cavendish Hotel.
Incredible view of London from the penthouse at the Cavendish Hotel.
Incredible view of London from the penthouse at the Cavendish Hotel. | Cavendish
It is luxurious, quiet and perfectly-placed - right in the heart of bustling London.

If the most important thing about a London hotel is the location, then The Cavendish Hotel wins Mayfair and square. Nestled on a backstreet in this old, posh district - famously the most expensive card in Monopoly - this four-star hotel is a short walk from Buckingham Palace, Leicester Square, the Royal Academy of Arts, Covent Garden and West End theatreland. Exclusive, independent shops and historic hamper specialist Fortnum and Mason are even closer.

Incredible view of London from the penthouse at The Cavendish Hotel.
Incredible view of London from the penthouse at The Cavendish Hotel.
Incredible view of London from the penthouse at The Cavendish Hotel. | Cavendish

Whatever your mission - we were here for the theatre - to get ‘home’ you exit the melee of tourists and traffic and stroll down quiet, one-way Jermyn Street. Free of the throng, it’s a chance to take in something other than world famous sights. The area is home to long-established tailors and art dealers, traditional pubs like The Red Lion and Chequers Tavern, and Grade I listed St James’s Church, designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren. We went to a matinee performance of Standing at the Sky’s Edge, the smash hit musical about Sheffield’s Park Hill flats, at the Gillian Lynne theatre on Drury Lane.

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David Walsh at the Gillian Lynne theatre on Drury Lane to see smash hit Sheffield musical Standing at the Sky's EdgeDavid Walsh at the Gillian Lynne theatre on Drury Lane to see smash hit Sheffield musical Standing at the Sky's Edge
David Walsh at the Gillian Lynne theatre on Drury Lane to see smash hit Sheffield musical Standing at the Sky's Edge | National World

It left us thrilled and moved by its story, its Richard Hawley-penned music, the acting and some genius staging. It deserves all of its many accolades and received a standing ovation from us and everyone there. It is on until August 3, and is the perfect excuse to visit London - and stay at The Cavendish Hotel. On arrival we were greeted warmly and handed keys to an Executive Room. Despite having a massive bed it still had space for a chaise longue - the epitome of elegant relaxation - although a bit lost on us.

Executive Room at The Cavendish Hotel, Mayfair, London.Executive Room at The Cavendish Hotel, Mayfair, London.
Executive Room at The Cavendish Hotel, Mayfair, London. | Cavendish

From our eleventh floor window it was easier to list the landmarks we couldn’t see as we gazed from the BT Tower to Big Ben, via almost every other notable building including St Paul’s Cathedral, the London Eye and the Shard. All very swish, only a landline phone on the wall beside the loo hinted at an earlier time. Apparently, and I had to Google this, they were popular in the eighties and nineties as an indication of luxury. We ate in the hotel restaurant, Mayfair Lounge and Grill, where we were welcomed with offers of a bottomless prosecco, which I was happy to accept.

The Cavendish Hotel in Mayfair with traditional London pub The Chequers Tavern below.
The Cavendish Hotel in Mayfair with traditional London pub The Chequers Tavern below.
The Cavendish Hotel in Mayfair with traditional London pub The Chequers Tavern below. | David Walsh

The only danger here was that staff were so attentive my glass was refilled before it was empty, making it increasingly difficult to keep track of consumption. We had truffle bread with our fried scallops and potato hash, asparagus and gribiche sauce starters. Sophisticated and delicious. The barbecue duck and wild garlic risotto mains redefined the term ‘moreish’ while the poached rhubarb pana cotta and lemon meringue pie proved the chef had mastered desserts too. If we had one criticism it was the lack of non-alcoholic drinks like gin or cider. A ‘mocktail,’ when it eventually arrived, was basically fruit juice, my wife judged. A second one never came.

The lobby at The Cavendish Hotel, a luxury four-star hotel on Jermyn Street, Mayfair.The lobby at The Cavendish Hotel, a luxury four-star hotel on Jermyn Street, Mayfair.
The lobby at The Cavendish Hotel, a luxury four-star hotel on Jermyn Street, Mayfair. | David Walsh

Before checking out we had time to wander over to Buckingham Palace and join the literally thousands of people who had turned up for the Changing of the Guard. Do not get this low key four-times-a-week ceremony mixed up with the annual Trooping the Colour or you will be disappointed. Five minutes from The Cavendish Hotel, St James's Square is fascinating for those, like this nosy journalist, who wonder about power, history and money.

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The Cavendish Hotel facts

Rating: Luxury 4-star hotel

Location: 81 Jermyn Street, Mayfair, London

Classic room from £215 per night; Superior from £245; Executive from £305; Junior suite from £413; Penthouse suite from £1,007 Dining: Mayfair Lounge & Grill open seven days offering breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner, serving till 9:30pm.

Parking: One hour: £11. Six-24 hours: £66

Celebration package: Champagne and chocolates, English breakfast and late check-out

The East India Club, an exclusive membership organisation which harks back to the dubious days of empire, and still excludes women, has a grand hall here. The global headquarters of oil giant BP are behind an understated wooden door at number one. In World War Two the Supreme Allied Command, led by general Dwight D Eisenhower, was formed and based for a time at number 31, Norfolk House, a couple of plaques state.

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I also stumbled on a memorial to PC Yvonne Fletcher who was gunned down from inside the Libyan embassy while policing a small demonstration on April 17 1984. It was a shock to stand on the spot after first seeing it on the news almost exactly 40 years ago. Leaving The Cavendish Hotel was easy, Piccadilly tube is five minutes’ walk and Kings Cross a few underground stops away.

Penthouse suite and balcony at The Cavendish Hotel.Penthouse suite and balcony at The Cavendish Hotel.
Penthouse suite and balcony at The Cavendish Hotel. | Cavendish

We were back in Sheffield after a change in Doncaster after what seemed to be an indecently hassle-free journey that, along with all that went before, set us up for a return visit, fair and square. 

To book: www.thecavendish-london.co.uk - Call 020 7930 2111

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