Bus named after Hope Valley passenger who used it throughout his life

A bus has been named after a Hope Valley man who travelled on it throughout his life.

Thursday, 19th December 2019, 11:45 am
Updated Thursday, 19th December 2019, 5:15 pm
The Bradwell Bob bus is named after regular customer who relied on the 272 service throughout his life.
The Bradwell Bob bus is named after regular customer who relied on the 272 service throughout his life.

The 272 First Bus service between Sheffield and Castleton was used regularly by Robert Oakes – known as Bob – who relied on it to get to work, visit his friends and family and enjoy days out.

First South Yorkshire said they were ‘delighted’ to name the bus Bradwell Bob following a suggestion by drivers, in tribute to Bob, from Hope, who sadly passed away aged 76.

The naming ceremony took place on December 17 at The Shoulder of Mutton in Bradwell and was attended by five of the First Bus drivers operating the route, Bob’s brother and nephew Mark Dakin, together with residents who had enjoyed a drink with Bob in the past.

First Bus driver Tony Behan with Bob's nephew Mark Dakin.

First Bus drivers Pete Black and Tony Behan helped to organise the naming of the bus and Tony said: “Bob would board the bus, always with a cheerful smile on his face and a kind word for the drivers who he knew by name. He often had a snack with him which was gratefully accepted.

“Rural communities are reliant upon buses to keep them moving, and Bob would always be there with his light shining as an aid to drivers on the dark winter nights.

“It is working for people like Bob that makes the driver’s job so worthwhile.”

Towards the end of his life Bob was treated for cancer and many First Bus drivers visited him in hospital before he died.

First Bus driver Tony Behan with Bob's nephew Mark Dakin.

Bob’s nephew, Mark, said: “Our family is touched by the honour and the many kind words from the drivers attending today.

“We are also very grateful to the drivers who visited Bob in hospital, which was particularly comforting to me as I live far away. It was a wonderful thing they did.”

Lynne Smith, landlady of the Shoulder of Mutton said: “Bob used to bring his mum, Eva, to the pub for a print, and when she died it would have been all too easy for him to stay home alone – the bus proved to be a lifeline for him to get out.”