Storm Arwen leaves Buxton care home residents without food, water or light for hours on end

A man has criticised a Buxton care centre after he said his mother was left with no support for hours on end following a power cut caused by Storm Arwen.

Friday, 3rd December 2021, 4:32 pm

Storm Arwen caused problems across the High Peak at the weekend, including leading to many residents suffering power cuts.

Thankfully power has now been restored to most parts of the High Peak including Thomas Fields on Brown Edge Road but the man says the care his mother received there was not good enough and she was left without light or food for several hours.

“The usual standard of care is poor but this weekend it was disgusting,” Luke Harrison said.

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Thomas Fields in Buxton was hit by Storm Arwen leaving elderly residents in the cold and dark for hours on end

"My mother, 66, called the managers of the site, they offered no support. Outside was six inches of snow so residents who are mostly aged over 80 were stranded.”

The building lost power at 4am on Saturday November, 27.

Luke said: "At 6pm I was called and told my mother was alright but the building still had no power.”

When Luke arrived to collect his mother and take her to his home in Manchester, he says the building was in complete darkness, the car park was covered in ice and snow, all the doors were unlocked and there was no emergency lighting.

He said: “My mother was sat in her apartment alone with no heating or water.

“The residents were extremely distressed and cold.”

The building is run by Derbyshire County Council (DCC) with Housing 21.

Responding to Luke’s comments, a DCC spokesperson said: “Along with other parts of the High Peak unfortunately Thomas Fields Care Centre was without power for around 15 hours at the weekend.

“We sent extra staff when it became apparent the power was going to be off for some time.

“Our staff looked after the residents in the care home part of the building and spoke with those who live in the 53 flats on a number of times to discuss arrangements including that of food, water, warmth and lighting.

“This incident has raised a number of issues that we will look into and we would appreciate hearing directly from the person whose mum lives at the home so we can address the specific concerns raised.”

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