Buxton mum owes her life to generous blood donors

Lauren Watson, with husband Dean and sons Bobby and Zac.
Lauren Watson, with husband Dean and sons Bobby and Zac.

A mother-of-two from Buxton who twice survived complications during labour said she owes her life to the generosity of blood donors.

Lauren Watson, who is now pregnant with her third child, has backed the Advertiser’s Give A Pint, Save A Life campaign, which is calling for more people to sign up and become blood donors.

Give a Pint, Save  A Life - the Buxton Advertiser's 2017 campaign to encourage more people to pledge to sign up as blood donors.

Give a Pint, Save A Life - the Buxton Advertiser's 2017 campaign to encourage more people to pledge to sign up as blood donors.

The 28-year-old, from Fairfield, said: “Both births have been really traumatic and I haemorrhaged when my two sons were born and lost a litre and half of blood each time.

“I don’t think I would have survived if I hadn’t been given the transfusions, so the people who give blood really do save lives.”

Lauren, a former donor herself, became anaemic during her first pregnancy with Bobby, who is now aged five.

Doctors tried her on iron tablets and even gave her an iron transfusion, leading to terrible side effects. She was later diagnosed as being allergic to iron.

She needed two units of blood during her first pregnancy and a further three after.

She said the symptoms of anaemia were worse during her second pregnancy because not only was she severely iron deficient, which was making her exhausted, she was also a mum to a toddler.

The married staff nurse at Cavendish Hospital said: “When Zac was born two years later I didn’t get to hold him for an hour as I had a retained placenta and the contractions were worse for that than the actual labour.

“Doctors didn’t know what to do - they gave me three injections to try and release it and one doctor even tried removing it without any pain relief before my mum told him he had to stop.”

Now 21 weeks into her third pregnancy, Lauren feels more prepared as doctors have already cross-matched blood ready for transfusions and she knows what to expect.

She added: “It has been very scary, but I’m still here as a mum and a wife because someone gave their blood for me - I couldn’t be more grateful.”