Buxton rail sidings extension will reduce quarry traffic on High Peak roads

A disused Buxton tip has been transformed into 430 metres of railway sidings - allowing freight trains to carry more aggregate from quarries in the area than before.

The £14m rail freight sidings extension - which allows freight companies to increase their wagons from 18 to 26 - will mean hundreds less lorries on High Peak roads every day.

Ruth George, MP, on the footbridge marking a �14m railway extension in Buxton on Monday.

Ruth George, MP, on the footbridge marking a �14m railway extension in Buxton on Monday.

Each train takes up to 2,500 tonnes of materials - taking the equivalent of 76 lorries off the road and cutting carbon emissions by 76 per cent per tonne of freight.

The 430-metre sidings have been engineered to allow freight companies who use the sidings as a turnback facility to get to quarries such as Dowlow and Tunstead.

Network Rail who built the sidings and building materials company Tarmac say the new sidings will boost productivity in the British construction sector and protect jobs in Buxton’s quarry industry.

Network Rail’s Martin Frobisher said: “This improves the efficiency of rail freight and will be a big improvement.

Rail staff re-orientate the engine on the roll in roll out sidings.

Rail staff re-orientate the engine on the roll in roll out sidings.

“This in turn improves the efficiency of the quarries and secures local jobs while improving the competitiveness of rail haulage.

“These are big heavy lorries - it’s great for the local community in terms of jobs and getting lorries off the roads.

“Carrying this material by rail is 76 per cent less carbon on the roads.”

Chris Swann, head of rail at Tarmac, said a more efficient railway meant an easier way of doing business for Tarmac and other aggregates firms.

Martin Frobisher, the Network Rail route managing director who attended the unveiling of new sidings in Buxton on Monday.

Martin Frobisher, the Network Rail route managing director who attended the unveiling of new sidings in Buxton on Monday.

He hoped this in-turn might ‘come through’ for other businesses in Buxton.

He said: “Our national strategy has long been to run bigger trains - the more economic we can be moving materials is a win for Buxton too.”

A freight train arrives at the new sidings which are part of a new �14m railway extension which was unveiled on Monday.

A freight train arrives at the new sidings which are part of a new �14m railway extension which was unveiled on Monday.

A Freight train parks up on the new sidings whilst a passenger train passes the new location.

A Freight train parks up on the new sidings whilst a passenger train passes the new location.

A freight train parks up on the new railway sidings in Buxton.

A freight train parks up on the new railway sidings in Buxton.

Ruth George, MP, takes a look at the plaque on the footbridge marking a �14m railway extension in Buxton on Monday.

Ruth George, MP, takes a look at the plaque on the footbridge marking a �14m railway extension in Buxton on Monday.