VIDEO & PICTURES: High Peak remembers 100 years since The Battle of The Somme

As the Last Post sounded around The Cenotaph at The Slopes, Buxton fell silent to remember the bloodiest battle in the British Army’s history.

Thursday, July 1 marked 100 years since the start of the battle of the Somme where nearly 20,000 Britons lost their lives on the first day of fighting.

A service of remembrance to commemorate the centenry of the Battle of the Somme was held at The Cenotaph in Buxton. Photo: Chris Etchells

A service of remembrance to commemorate the centenry of the Battle of the Somme was held at The Cenotaph in Buxton. Photo: Chris Etchells

The Reverend John Hughton led the service of remembrance and he said: “We are here to honour the memory of those inhabited the war-shattered landscape, those who showed great courage and loyalty to comrades at arms.”
The Battle of the Somme, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British and French empires against the German Empire in 1916.

The town of Buxton lost 15 men that day who worked as quarrymen for the Buxton Lime Firms.

Paying their respects was representatives from the Royal British Legion Buxton branch and High Peak Borough Council.

Grandaughter of a Whaley Bridge Somme solider, Sally Madden was paying her respects at the ceremony.

She said: “My grandfather - Walter Naden - fought at The Somme, he came home and to honour his service there is a street named after him Walter Wood.

“I had to be here today to pay my respects to those that didn’t come home and I am pleased other people are here although it would have been nice to see more younger people.”
Rev Houghton added: “Now is the time to remember the reconciliation and look to peaceful options in times of conflict and uncertainty.”

Other

Three apprentices from Tarmac at Tunstead unveiled the poppy they have made in memory of the 15 men who worked at the Buxton Lime Firms and laid down their lives at the Battle of the Somme, 100 years ago.

On each of the petals are engraved the names of the men who lost their lives, which was unveiled at a special 100th anniversary commemorative event held at Tarmac’s offices in Tunstead.

The Tarmac apprentices who produced the poppy are Liam Garner, Jack Nuttall and George Woodward. The event was attended by staff and local VIPs including Kim Shilcock, from the Derbyshire branch of the Institute of Quarrying.

She said: “This is a very moving and fitting tribute to the memory of the men who worked at the Buxton Lime Firms. The poppy has captured the imagination of the nation and memorials, such as this, will serve to keep the human legacy of war alive for future generations.”