Untouchable when it comes to caring

Heading for India, students Mireille Howie, Olivia Ashley and Adam Mills with charity organiser Simon Hawthorne
Heading for India, students Mireille Howie, Olivia Ashley and Adam Mills with charity organiser Simon Hawthorne

A High Peak-based charity is to take three students to India to see its work and record a documentary in the world’s largest slum.

They fly out this weekend to see the work of the Life Association in the Dharavi Slums in Mumbai.

Charity organiser Simon Hawthorne said: “ There are advanced plans to demolish the slum and so a record of this would be valuable.”

The students will be visiting the recycling centre in the slum where 80 per cent of Mumbai’s plastic is recycled alongside a wide range of other products, a far higher figure than the UK achieves.

They will be recording their trip as a documentary and will present their findings to the school and local community along with recommendations as to how we can all be more efficient in recycling and stewardship.

The Slums, featured in Kevin McCloud’s Slumming It shown on C4 in January 2010, have 85 per cent employment, very low levels of crime but a measurably high level of contentment, despite the filth and squalor of slum life.

The students will then be travelling to rural India to contrast inner city poverty with a Dalit’s life in the countryside.

The Dalit people, known as the ‘untouchables’, have been expected to drink from clay cups that are then destroyed so that others don’t have to drink from them.

Life Association uses this powerful symbol to raise funds for them. Dalit Candles are hand made in the slum to raise funds.

All the profits go to support the charity’s work with street children and their schools and children’s homes in rural India.

To find out more about the charity visit www.lifeassociation.co.uk.