Looking back to Longshaw in World War One

looking back: soldiers at Longshaw. Photo contributed.
looking back: soldiers at Longshaw. Photo contributed.

The National Trust’s Longshaw Estate is to host a talk on Wednesday, November 21 about Longshaw’s significant role during the First World War, when it was home to many wounded soldiers.

During the First World War military hospitals were overflowing with injured soldiers from the front line. Convalescent and auxiliary hospitals were required and were often offered by owners of large houses and estates.

calm before the storm of the war: fun on Longshaw Pond. Photo contributed.

calm before the storm of the war: fun on Longshaw Pond. Photo contributed.

In February 1915 the owner of Longshaw Lodge, the Duke of Rutland, generously offered his lodge to Colonel A M Connell for the use of restoring the health of sick soldiers.

Longshaw Lodge was an ideal place for treating wounded and sick soldiers as it is situated in easy access to Sheffield for transport links and is also surrounded by open moors and beautiful countryside.

As well as receiving attentive treatment, the soldiers took delight in recreation around the estate such as playing cards, billiards, listening to live music and of course, walking over the moors.

Local historian Thelma Griffiths presents the significance of Longshaw Lodge during the War and will reveal details of the soldiers’ experiences as well as personal stories from the medical volunteers and staff from their stay at the convalescent home.

The talk will be held at the Moorland Discovery centre on the National Trust’s Longshaw Estate, from 2pm-4pm, and costs £7 per person, including a delicious cream tea. Please call 01433 670368 or email peakdistrict@nationaltrust.org.uk for booking and enquiries.