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Chapel-en-le-Frith nurse awarded MBE

birthday honours, Anne Cawthorn MBE pictured at Blythe House Hospice

birthday honours, Anne Cawthorn MBE pictured at Blythe House Hospice

A Chapel-en-le-Frith nurse is “overjoyed” at receiving an MBE at the weekend in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for her services to cancer patients.

Anne Cawthorn was recognised for her work at Blythe House Hospice, on Eccles Fold, in Chapel, and with Macmillan nurses.

The 64-year-old said the accolade was “quite unexpected” adding: “I’m absolutely thrilled and quite touched that people have taken the trouble to nominate me and support the application.

“I got a letter about five weeks ago; I was absolutely overjoyed. “You hear of other people getting them but never in my wildest dreams did I think I’d get one. I’m dedicating it to all the patients I’ve worked with and my family.”

Anne, of Hoderns Park Road, said her colleagues had found the news equally as surprising as they had put her name forward two and a half years ago.

“I’ve been told it can take up to 180 hours for them to check you’re who people say you are and find evidence of the work you do with different organisations,” she explained.

Reverend Betty Packham, who founded Blythe House in 1989, was among those who recommended Anne for an honour.

The grandmother-of-two has now been invited to attend a ceremony at Buckingham Palace to receive her MBE on a date yet to be confirmed.

Anne began her career aged 17, training at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital and Manchester Royal Infirmary.

“A nurse was all I ever wanted to be,” she explained. “It’s lovely to be able to help people in an individual way and cater to everybody’s needs and tailor their support.”

Anne, who also trained in aromatherapy, psychotherapy and hypnotherapy, spent 25 years working at the Devonshire Royal Hospital in Buxton, before becoming a nursing lecturer at University of Manchester and the Christie hospital.

She was praised for developing one of the first specialist practice advanced nursing courses in the UK, which taught nurses how best to care for people with rheumatological disorders.

Anne is also credited with setting up of the Complementary Therapy Service at the Neil Cliffe Cancer Care Centre in Manchester and the Living Well Service, in connection with Macmillan Cancer, at Blythe House, which helps those with life-threatening illnesses maximise their quality of life. Now semi-retired, she supervises Macmillan nurses at Beechwood Cancer Care, in Stockport.

 

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