Football club gives cancer the red card

Dr Debbie Austin with Buxton FC manager Martin McIntosh and players Stuart Ludlum Jamie Green and Steve Istead

Dr Debbie Austin with Buxton FC manager Martin McIntosh and players Stuart Ludlum Jamie Green and Steve Istead

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Buxton FC has backed a national campaign to show men’s cancers the red card by promoting healthy lifestyles and the importance of regular check-ups.

Bucks manager Martin McIntosh and his first team squad are supporting Blue September, a campaign founded by the Urology Foundation to reduce the number of men dying needlessly from cancer.

Martin said: “It’s not well known that men are actually at higher risk of developing a wide range of cancers than women.

“As a club that plays in blue and understands the importance of living a healthy life, this campaign is right up our street.

“Blue September spells out that men can significantly reduce their risk of developing prostate, lung, skin, bowel and testicular cancer by heeding some sound advice on healthy lifestyles and by looking out for the tell-tale signs of various cancers – many of which can be cured if caught early enough.”

The club’s efforts were welcomed by Dr Debbie Austin, High Peak GP and member of the CCG’s governing body, who said: “By detecting cancer in its early stages you greatly increase your chances of beating the disease. Cancer is no longer an automatic death sentence as there is now a wide range of treatments. But the sooner they start the more successful they are likely to be.”

Symptoms include unusual growths or lumps, unexplained weight loss and loss of appetite, a sore or ulcer that won’t heal, a nagging cough or hoarseness, or coughing up blood. Men should visit their GP if they have a mole that bleeds or changes shape, unexplained changes in bowel or bladder habits, or unusual discharges. Although the symptoms are often signs of more common, less serious problems, men should call their doctor straight away if they persist. Free, confidential advice is available by calling NHS 111.