Fairfield cries foul over mess

High Peak Borough Council put their foot down on dog fouling in Fairfield, councillors Fiona Sloman, Caitlin Bisknell and Anthony Mckeown assisted by Gordon the dog, anti social behaviour officer Hannah Cocker and Chloe Dempster, Holly Bentley, Eleanor McGill and Hannah Morson of Fairfield Endowed Junior School's Eco Council.
High Peak Borough Council put their foot down on dog fouling in Fairfield, councillors Fiona Sloman, Caitlin Bisknell and Anthony Mckeown assisted by Gordon the dog, anti social behaviour officer Hannah Cocker and Chloe Dempster, Holly Bentley, Eleanor McGill and Hannah Morson of Fairfield Endowed Junior School's Eco Council.

A DOG FOULING fight-back has been launched in Fairfield after complaints from residents.

The High Peak Borough Council crackdown, which was launched this week, will see the dog warden picking up strays while civil enforcement officers carry out high-visibility patrols and hand out on-the-spot fines to owners who don’t clear up after their pet.

Organised by the council’s community safety team, the fight-back was called for by council leader Caitlin Bisknell and fellow Fairfield councillor Fiona Sloman after they received complaints from disgruntled householders.

The campaign will also include the removal of dog dirt from black spot areas by the council’s Clean Team.

A large banner is to be displayed outside Fairfield Endowed Junior School to spell out the penalties faced by dog owners who fail to clean up after their pets and a presentation is also set to take place at the school to highlight the health risks created by dog dirt.

Households in areas with a particular problem will get a leaflet urging them to report the culprits.

Dog walkers who refuse to clean up after their pets will be handed a £50 fixed penalty and offenders failing to pay up would be liable for a fine of up to £1,000 in a magistrates court.

Posters will also be put up in shop windows, appealing for public-spirited citizens to act as the council’s eyes and ears.

Cllr Bisknell said: “Dog fouling is not only an unpleasant environmental crime; it can also cause dangerous diseases such as toxocariasis, which can lead to blindness in extreme cases.”

And Cllr Sloman added: “I live in Fairfield and walk my dog in the neighbourhood every day. I understand that scooping the poop isn’t the nicest job in the world – especially first thing in the morning. But it’s important that we act responsibly in the interests of our communities and our pets.”

Anthony McKeown, executive councillor for community services, added that the council was also calling on dog walkers to take their used dog waste bags home with them or put them in a litter bin instead of throwing them onto verges or hanging them on trees, causing a health hazard.

To report dog fouling, call (01298) 28400.